"through resarch, local support and raising awareness we can help beat depression."

Living With Depression | Terms You Might Hear | Treatments

Depression Terms You Might Hear

Everyone's experience of depression is different. However, several specific types of depression have been identified.

Reactive depression

This type of depression is triggered by a traumatic, difficult or stressful event, and people affected will feel low, anxious, irritable, an even angry. Reactive depression can also follow prolonged period of stress and can begin even after the stress is over.

Endogenous depression

Endogenous depression is not always triggered by an upsetting or stressful event. Those affected by this common form of depression will experience physical symptoms such as weight change, tiredness, sleeping problems and low mood, as well as poor concentration an low self-esteem.

Manic depression (also known as bipolar depression)

People with manic depression experience mood swings, with 'highs' of excessive energy and elation, to 'lows' of utter despair and lethargy. Delusions of hallucinations can also occur. Most people with this condition have their first episode in their late teens or early twenties. Visit the Manic Depression Fellowship for more information.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

This type of depression generally coincides with the approach of winter. It is often linked to shortening of daylight hours and lack of sunlight. Symptoms will include wanting to sleep excessively and cravings for carbohydrates or sweet foods. Special 'light boxes' can be used to treat this kind of depression. For more information about SAD visit our publications page to download a free leaflet or go to our community links for a list of organisations.

Post-natal depression

Many new mothers will experience baby blues; mood swings, crying spells and feelings of loneliness three or four days after giving birth. Post-natal depression will however last for much longer and will include symptoms such as panic attacks, sleeping difficulties, having overwhelming fears about dying, and feelings of inadequacy and being unable to cope.

Post-natal depression is a common condition, affecting between 10% and 20% of new mothers. Starting two or three weeks after delivery, it often develops slowly, making it more difficult to diagnose. Often it goes unrecognised by the woman herself, or by her family. For more information about post-natal depression visit our publications page to download a free leaflet or go to our community links for a list of organisations.

Living With Depression | Terms You Might Hear | Treatments

Depression Alliance depends on donations to continue its vital work. To show your support please CLICK HERE to Donate using our secure donation page.